Over the past two decades, technological developments have dramatically improved internet speeds. Back when dial-up was the standard method to connect to the internet, even waiting for a low-res image to load gave you time to go make a coffee. These days, broadband and fiber connections have created lightning fast networks where even HD media can be loaded in a just a few seconds. That’s not to say there isn’t room for improvement… 

https://search.app.goo.gl/gSj2

After reports and studies revealed that browsers’ private modes aren’t that secure, MIT graduate student Frank Wang decided to take things into his own hands. He and his team from MIT CSAIL and Harvard have created a tool called Veil, which you could use on a public computer — or on a private one on top of using incognito mode and Tor if you have big secrets to keep or if you’ve just become paranoid after years of hearing about hacks and cyberattacks… 
https://search.app.goo.gl/FxJ5

The body isn’t even cold yet, but AT&T is wasting no time in rolling out new “features” that fly in the face of net neutrality. The company has expanded its “sponsored data” program to prepaid wireless customers, offering content companies the option to “sponsor” their data so that it doesn’t count against users’ caps.

This, in case you’re wondering, is what you find under the definition of “paid fast lanes” in the net neutrality false promises hall of fame… 

https://search.app.goo.gl/k9im

Hackers could have hijacked and taken control of T-Mobile’s customer accounts thanks to a severe bug on the company’s website.
The vulnerability was found and reported by a security researcher on December 19 of last year, but it hasn’t been revealed until now. Within a day, T-Mobile classified it as “critical,” patched the bug, and gave the researcher a $5,000 reward. That’s good news, but it’s unclear how long the site was vulnerable and whether any malicious hackers found and exploited the bug before it was fixed… 

https://search.app.goo.gl/733t

The Windows 10 Fall Creators Update is now on almost all Windows 10 PCs, reaching 85 percent of machines, according to the latest numbers provided by AdDuplex.
One swallow doesn’t make a summer, but the rollout of version 1709 suggests that Microsoft has found its rhythm for these updates. In response to a range of annoying problems around the deployment of version 1607, the company was very conservative with the release of version 1703. Microsoft uses a phased rollout scheme, initially pushing each update only to systems with hardware configurations known to be compatible and then expanding its availability to cover a greater and greater proportion of the Windows install base….

https://search.app.goo.gl/WjXL